A Star Wars Sonnet Before Rogue One

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Methought I cast upon the heroine

Methought I cast upon the heroine
   Myself as light, like Jedi from the grave,
   Whom Force to orphaned princess power gave,
   And made her mortal heir of lustered jinn.
Hers, as one unseduced by Sith Lord kin,
   Pined peacefully in Alderaan’s enclave;
   Then verged her brow as blasted heart ash, save
   A smuggler Yavin-bound her gaze did win.
I, limelight, incandesced before the want
   Of martyred swains, as photons sought her face.
   Dame’s valiant mien, no Tarkin star could daunt,
Became the storied visage artists trace.
   Yet when her irises I dared to haunt,
   She blinked, I glanced, and faded from her grace.

Poet’s Notes for the Curious:

The above poem is an homage and adaptation of John Milton’s classic sonnet, Methought I saw my late espoused saint. I set out to do a poem exploring the nature of heroines in Star Wars, but when I decided to adapt Milton’s verse, I sank contentedly into portraying boyish unrequited love. Hopefully other fan poets caught up in the spirit of Rogue One will pen rich celebrations for the growing ranks of leading Star Wars heroines.

Please check out last year’s poem and image:

Elegy for a Country Space Opera

By way of credit, the above Photoshop creation draws on three pictures I licensed from istockphoto.com: a gent portrait from Pali Rao; a lady portrait from photoaliona; and a starfield image by Natalia_80. I also used a NASA image of Saturn’s moon Mimas, rightly dubbed the “Death Star” moon.

Sans serif shuttle font and Sally

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Shuttle Challenger
Image Credit: NASA

Or is it serif shuttle font? Help me out, good reader. First, find the number seven in the above image. Hint, the space shuttle is making the numeral.

There is at least one other image from the STS-7 mission out there where you can see the Challenger’s Canadarm forming the number seven. The STS-7 crew, like any self-respecting artists, chose to autograph their work. And I’m going to say it’s a serif font, because the End effector, or hand portion of the Canadarm, provides a flourish on the 7’s tip. This is literature formed by the most famous robot arm to fly in space!

The late Dr. Sally Ride recounts this numerical photo exploit–apparently done without the foreknowledge of mission control–in an interview she gave to the NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project in 2002. I stumbled onto the interview yesterday and highly recommend reading the whole thing. The back and forth between Sally and interviewer Rebecca Wright is quite conversational and very accessible to non-scientists like me.

Interview with Dr. Sally Ride

I was overdue to spend an afternoon with Dr. Ride, if only through her legacy and her words. Here is one of my favorite quotes from the interview. Sally describes her role in the launch of the shuttle Challenger during the STS-7 mission, which made her the first American woman to go into space:

“One of the first things that I was supposed to do—seven seconds after ignition—was, once the Shuttle started to roll, to say, “Roll program.” I’ll guarantee that those were the hardest words I ever had to get out of my mouth. It’s not easy to speak seven seconds after launch.”

Following two shuttle missions, Dr. Ride embarked on a career in academia. She taught physics at the University of California, San Diego. She also became a prolific writer, co-authoring several books. Those wanting to learn more about her contributions to science and literature should visit the Sally Ride Science website.

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Image Credit: Sally Ride Science

From NASA’s website: “This image shows Sally Ride, America’s first woman in space, who was also part of NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Ride led the Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students (MoonKAM) project, which allowed students nationwide to target lunar images to be taken by Ebb and Flow, the two GRAIL spacecraft.”

Two-faced Haiku for Neptune

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Voyager’s Neptune (nice version)

Orb. Bear your stitching
Scar. Icy shines your still life
Face. Blue clouds rejoin.

Voyager’s Neptune (mean version)

You. Bear your stitching
Scar. Icy shines your orb’s poor
Trait. Blue clouds sever.


Poet’s Note

I did not set out to write two versions, let alone a nice and mean one. As a lazy Sunday morning writing activity, I decided to compose a single haiku based on a NASA image. I chose the above picture, actually a composite of multiple images from the Voyager 2 flyby of Neptune. It includes what appears to be a faint photo-stitching line running vertically through the left quarter of Neptune. My plan from the outset was to give the poem a corresponding scar by use of enjambment, which now that I explain it sounds kinda mean. Maybe that’s why the first version I completed was the mean one. But, loving the picture and admiring NASA’s imaging talent, I kept playing till I had a nice haiku as well.